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7'11" fun board

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  • 7'11" fun board

    Working now on 7'11" fun board. This is my third wooden board and is a huge learning experience as it is the first full size one I have done totally from scratch. It is cedar with cherry "stringer" stripes for accent.

    Planks started as rough sawn northern cedar. Turned them into smooth lumber and milled down.

    Design started as an idea in my head to create a board designed for the waves I typically surf in North Carolina and Costa Rica. I had a ton of fun designing it, trying to figure out the million options at hand for me - rails, rocker, outline, etc. I also learned shape 3D and did it in CAD.

    Frame is birch plywood (didn't make that!) cut out on a CNC router at my local maker space. Same for the rocker table inserts.

    Cove and groove strips cut from the same cedar at the maker space.

    So - we'll see how it turns out but I'm having a ton of fun in the process. Building up the rails now. Hope to have it done and in the water by May.
    Last edited by bradbarron; 03-22-2019, 06:20 PM.

  • #2
    Looking good. You can color me green with jealousy. I would love to have access to a cnc anything. It would definitely take out the tedious steps in the beginning that I don't like.

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    • #3
      Nice looking project!
      Randy http://clearwoodpaddleboards.com/
      https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuW...E0CzWCHvzwiVJQ

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      • #4
        more progress. I hope to have this in the water by June but life keeps getting in the way. Damn responsabilities!

        next step is to get the interior blocking in. Hopefully this weekend

        . Click image for larger version

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bradbarron View Post
          more progress. I hope to have this in the water by June but life keeps getting in the way. Damn responsabilities!
          I relate far to much to this statement.

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          • #6
            Board is looking good also!

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            • #7
              What's the plan with the stepped ribs on top?
              Kook on a wood board.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kevin keith View Post
                What's the plan with the stepped ribs on top?
                I could be wrong, but I believe it is planned for where the bead and cove rails will end. That way he doesn't have to plane and sand the top of the rail flat to match the dome of the board for glueing on the deck. He can finish the bead and cove, then glue the deck on.

                That's at least what it looks like to me.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by phillipjohnw View Post

                  I could be wrong, but I believe it is planned for where the bead and cove rails will end. That way he doesn't have to plane and sand the top of the rail flat to match the dome of the board for glueing on the deck. He can finish the bead and cove, then glue the deck on.

                  That's at least what it looks like to me.
                  yep - that is it (kind of). The first board I did was from Grain and they used this technique. after I plane the cove and bead down to the step, I add a wide mini plank to get the height to the top of the rib curve. This gives a 1-1.5" gluing surface around the edge of the board instead of just gluing to the edge of the cove and bead. While I don't have experience with other methods, it works pretty well and hardly adds any weight. you can see this in a few pics from my Grain Waterlog build below.

                  On the Waterlog, I also reinforced the ribs. Don't think I will do that though on this one.

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                  • #10
                    I never had a problem with glueing to top deck to the bead and cove. I also never had mine recessed like yours. By the time it was planed and sanded flat/flush with the ribs, I had a 1"-2" glueing surface. I might try the reinforcements on the ribs, not so much for added strength but for added glue area.

                    I know at least one board of mine the the deck came unglued a bit at the nose. You could only tell if you intentionally stepped/pressed hard on the front 8" or so.

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                    • #11
                      you know - I bet it comes down to har far up you run the bead and cove. Probably get the same effect doing how you did it. In my case, the B&C stops close tot he edge of the rail and doesn't bend much around the sides. different ways to address the same question!

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                      • #12
                        I agree. I lay down layers until the flat side is nearly horizontal or I run out of pieces. The next board I make is planned to be a 7'6" funboard similar to this build and I am going to try to skimp on the amount of wood I use for the rails. I have been using thick bead and cove strips ( strips originally 1/2" x 3/8" before routing) which gives a sturdy rail, but cost weight.

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