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6‘6“ Single Fin

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  • #31
    That board looks unbelievable. I hope it rides as well as it looks.

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    • #32
      Click image for larger version

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ID:	7527 Thank you; I think it ist the best looking board, i have ever made, but there are still a lot of tiny flaws. Visible glue lines in the rails, two small dry spots of laminate and others, but aus Said, best ever.
      Did the hopefully final epoxy coating 2 hours ago. I will leave it at least 24, better 36 hours, then I will start to sand from 180 or 240 up to about 400, preparing for the varnish... Hopefully no real problems during sanding will appear. Screwing the goretex vent in, will be the final step.
      Remains, that it rides well!

      Last edited by Olddude; 03-02-2019, 10:50 AM.
      The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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      • #33
        Final epoxy went well, one day to wait, then wetsanding and varnish...

        Click image for larger version

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        The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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        • #34
          board look great! nice job.
          have you ever wet sanded up to 2000 grit then polished with polisher (power sander with foam attachment)? the finish has a luxurious look and feel to it that cannot be achieved by varnish.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by duhn View Post
            board look great! nice job.
            have you ever wet sanded up to 2000 grit then polished with polisher (power sander with foam attachment)? the finish has a luxurious look and feel to it that cannot be achieved by varnish.
            Actually I want to sand the varnish like you described. According to my supplier (a boat service). the varnish adds mechanical strength, UV protection and shines more brilliant than pure epoxy. That is why I give it a try, but the process takes very long, it takes about ine day to be able to apply another coat. Then it takes at minimum 5 days to harden, that it is sandable... And if you have varnished one side completly, it may take two or three days to turn it around and make the other side..., additionally the process is not idiot proof.
            To make the story short, if the final result is not a big step ahead, I will not do it again...
            I‘m ready with 3 coats on one side, but it does not look really good, I need to sand and polish, but first I will do the other side. The varnish sets really fast, I had not finished it rolling on (and I worked fast, talking minutes) when it already was almost too hard to tip off. Maybe I should have applied it thicker, but to thick and you get saggs.
            The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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            • #36
              Click image for larger version

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ID:	7557 Did some quick and dirty fins... They still need a little sanding and a final coat.


              The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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              • #37
                Nice looking fins. Are they 3 layers laminated together or just plywood? How did you do the tab part? Cut the outline out, then rabbet the tab with a table saw, and finally shape the fin? What are you using to coat them?

                My problem with making fins is that I seem to over think the construction and never finish.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by phillipjohnw View Post
                  Nice looking fins. Are they 3 layers laminated together or just plywood? How did you do the tab part? Cut the outline out, then rabbet the tab with a table saw, and finally shape the fin? What are you using to coat them?
                  .
                  I made it pretty easy...:
                  I found some scrap plywood in my shop of about 8mm (1/4'), which is almost the width of the finbox slot.
                  I cut the templates (from blending curves) out, including the tab part! Then I had some heavy cloth (about 8oz) leftovers. On one side of the already cutted plywood I laminated the cloth and 6mm scrap balsa. Just some epoxy on the cloth, balsa board on top, pressing, waiting ready.
                  This results in a piece which shows a plywood fin on one side, "lying" on top of glass and balsa. The balsa side, which stands over the plywood is cut with a jig saw and the process repeated with the other side... balsa, resin cloth, waiting, cutting... In the result you get a 20mm thick outlined fin.
                  Then I drew the base line of the fin with a pencil for the tab and cut through with the knife until I toughed the glass on either side. Using a sharp chisel you can reomove the light balsa from the tab easily, on both sides. The tab part is now almost finished, its just a layer of glass, plywood and glass, which goes throughout the entire fin. And depending on the glass, it fits almost perfect into the fin box. you may drill the holes for the pin and the screw now.
                  since the upper fin itself is mainly balsa now, its very easy to give it some foil and shape, a rasp and some sandpaper, eyeballing, ready. We are talking minutes...
                  This result is just brushed or rolled with epoxy, no glass, the metal pin is glued in. You may need to brush the tab, according to the glass used, to match the final width.
                  If hardened you can check, how it fits into the finbox now. Either remove some epoxy or ad another layer to the tap part. A second layer on the balsa part gives a little more strength.

                  Sounds complicated, but it it really fast to do, the only time you need is for laminating both sides one after the other. I foiled them very thick, the width of all fins is about 15-16mm or almost 6/8'. I did it on purpose, because I do have some bought narrower fins and now I can compare the bought one, with one of the three, regarding the width and the the three with the same width regarding shape.
                  Will be interesting to find out out, which one suits best for the board and me...

                  The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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                  • #39
                    I do remember a lengthy thread on sways about thicker fins. I believe one of the guys was 3d printing a bunch, mostly high aspect and tubercled "whale" fins but most were thicker than normal. If I recall, I think they also had a problem snapping at the tab. Probably because that is the thinnest part.

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                    • #40
                      Read something at Sways too, and especially Bill Thrailkill recommend a foiled thicker fins, if I remember right, but maybe only for the twingle setup.. Regarding the width effect, I can and will compare this year. I never changed a fin by now, not even the position. If the board rode, however like, i was content. Now I will have the possibilitie to get a little more knowledge.
                      I'm not afraid of snapping at the tab. 8oz glass is very strong, actually I still hope that it snaps easy enough at the thin front, if It needs to, if it hits something or somebody....
                      The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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                      • #41
                        Just returned from one week of surfing in Portugal, unfortunately not really good waves, the last three days it was very small, so I used my "watered" 8'3 pintail. The first 4 days waves were of good height (for me up to chesthigh) but not clean and closing out. But the board performed well. I did not have the chance to make the fin tests, but after getting used to the board I would say it is a decent short board for an old guy or early intermediate. Waves where quite easy to catch, due to volume, but you have to have your weight into the right place, due to the short length. The board is easy to balance due to its width, but I cannot really value its turning abilities, the waves did not let me get good chances. Best is, that the goretex vent worked flawless and no water drained anywhere into the board. No hazzle with vent screws, I just flushed the valve after each surf with sweet water, ready. I'm really glad about this and I think now I have found my way to build my boards...
                        Next project will be the 3rd trial of building the GJ Nelson adaption, because I was again impressed by the abilities of this shape. Even the mushiest waves were rideable and it should work up to head high. It gets much earlier into the waves than the 6'6 and it does definitely turn too.
                        Last edited by Olddude; 05-15-2019, 09:57 AM.
                        The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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