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  • done hot coating, now what?

    Hi all! My SUP is now glassed up to the hot coat, getting so excited! I'm unsure of the exact order of events for the final coats, sanding grits, boxes and plugs. Can you please confirm or modify my timeline, and answer any questions? Thanks again everyone!!

    The entire board has been hot coated.

    1- flatten with 160 grit
    2- recoat burn through spots and dry weave
    3- flatten with 160
    4- install fin box and plugs
    5- gloss coat using tape skirt
    6- sand from 160 - 400
    7- varnish
    8- sand to 400 again??

    I have a few small spots of dry weave, less than a 1/4" each. If I scrape these out, do I need to patch these tiny spots with glass, or will filling them with epoxy be strong enough?
    At what point is a fiberglass patch needed? For example if I have a bad burn through, how much damage warrants a new patch?
    I will reach out to Resin Research, but wondering if anyone here has used it and found a compatible UV varnish?

    Thank you!!!
    Jeff


  • #2
    Howdy Jeff.............Here's my take after 20 or so hollow wood boards:

    I would use a courser grit between hot and gloss coats...100 grit if the surface is decent. The gloss coat will fill the scratches left by the courser grits like 100 or 120. You COULD certainly use something like 150 but it will take longer than it needs to using that fine a grit.... 100 grit, or even 80 wouldn't be unusual for me. Often, it takes me a couple of "gloss" coats to get enough material down to sand without burn-through s...it can be tricky to spot treat the burn throughs and sand them flat without going through another adjacent spot.,.as far as fin boxes, I ALWAYS glass them in. Many of the better boxes (https://www.gearbox.surf/hanalei-fins/)are designed this way...it's cheap insurance...leaks can occur around boxes not glassed in due to the amount of side loading involved in boards that are surfed. "Tape skirt" is typically referred to as a cut lap....but same idea as the tape skirt. I try to wrap the glass around the rail "corners" since that's often where boards take the most abuse. I also go to the trouble to tape the glass around the top and bottom rail "corners" so it stays in place when I'm saturating the weave. Once you've got a good gloss coat down and rough sand it flat, I work up to 150 grit before clearcoating. The clear coat I like, Interlux Perfection Plus marine varnish, is the very best I've found...catalyzed urethane designed for "roll and tip" application. It cures hard enough to wet sand and polish. Single part spar varnishes don't get hard enough to polish well and don't work with some spray on traction products. If you go the cut and polish route with PP marine varnish you'll want to start with nothing courser than 400 grit when you wet sand, and work up to at least 1500 grit....2000 grit if you want high gloss. The courser grits (220 or 320) at this phase leave scratches that must be removed to get a good polish, which is not the case with gloss coat prior to clear coat/marine varnish. The first couple of grits when wet sanding are the hardest....from there they go more quickly. I wouldn't skip grits since it's just harder to sand out the previous grits micro scratches.

    Dry weave is mostly an aesthetic problem....it does create a bit of a weak spot but isn't going to make or break your board, especially with a good clear coat over it. If you're really fussy, cut it out and patch it.

    Pretty much any marine varnish will work over Resin Research epoxy....But as I mentioned Perfection Plus is the very best and the only roll and tip product that works with "Monster Paint" clear traction. If it's a surf sup you'll probably be using a pad or wax so it doesn't matter. On touring sup's I like Monster paint and the stuff really lasts.

    A detail scraper like the one in the photo (http://www.amazon.com/Bahco-Premium-...=carbide+scrap) will save a lot of dusty sanding. Uncured epoxy is poison and it takes quite a while for epoxies to fully cure....sanding dust is toxic.

    OK, that's my take...not a pro glasser but have learned some hard lessons. I hope some of it helps.

    Randy
    Randy http://clearwoodpaddleboards.com/
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuW...E0CzWCHvzwiVJQ

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Randy! Great info, I appreciate your time.

      Do you use the reducer with the Interlux?

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, I use the reducer maxed out...the build isn't as quick so it takes more coats but it definitely flow out better.
        Randy http://clearwoodpaddleboards.com/
        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuW...E0CzWCHvzwiVJQ

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Randy,
          "as far as fin boxes, I ALWAYS glass them in. "
          are you saying you fiberglass the inside of the routed blocking, before inserting the fin box?
          I did not line the routed block with fiberglass, but I do like the idea of adding extra fiberglass around the box to help with water sealing and strength but my standard bahne box does not leave much room for doing so.

          Comment


          • #6
            I usually route the finbox slot with a little play to the sides, then I put in the box and check the depth. If not deep enough another pass with the router. Checking again. If it sits quite right, I check that the surface of the finbox is flush to the board, usually it is not, because the boards curves. The I sand the finbox top to match the curve of the wood. The finbox should sit in the slot absolutely flush to the bottom. If this is achieved, I pour some resin into the slot, put a fin in the finbox and put the box in the slot, fixing it with some tape over the fin, chech for straight and eventual angles. Usually the resin rises, when the box is set in, but usually it is not enaough. I fill out the sides, using a syringe until the space is completely filled. its better to have a little elevated resin line then have to refill later. When everything works out well, you just have to sand very little to have a flush surface from wood,resin,box,slot,box,resin, wood '(from left to right).
            And then I glass the entire bottom including the box. If the glass and resin is applied, you still can see the slot. If hardened, the glass over the slot will bei removed wtih knife and dremel...

            Maybe Randy means the same with "glassing" in. There is no need to have glass around the box if it sits completely in wood, you may need some glass, if it sits in foam, but according to me not in wood, But I put the bottom layer of glass over the box!
            The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks OD! If i glass over the box, im worried the box will just collect a lot of resin. But i guess it is easy enough to control and clean up?

              Comment


              • #8
                I also do like old dude, but to prevent resin in my boxes I fill the with wax, usually old surf wax or old candles. If it's a large box like a 10" bahne box I'll put in wood or some other filler under the wax. Just get a lighter and carefully fill them. Don't fill it all the way because the heat from the resin gelling can cause it to expand causing a delamination around the box. Also sand/clean it really good if you drip any wax on the top of the box, same delam can happen. It happened on two of my boards. I'll see if I can find some pictures.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Oh wow.. Im so close and yet Im still adding pita tasks onto the project!
                  My first experience with Bahne box too, feels kind of clumsy and inefficient for a first timer, and not designed for easy glassing which one would think would be kind of necessary.

                  Im probably just getting impatient, back in march I had dreams of paddling all summer lol!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    https://youtu.be/gmrMczUCgwE

                    This is a good video for how they are normally installed and can be done on a wood board. I Usually install before I glass for ease of repairs if I miss my blocking when routing the slot.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by vonBobo View Post
                      Thanks OD! If i glass over the box, im worried the box will just collect a lot of resin. But i guess it is easy enough to control and clean up?
                      If you apply the resin with a roller and roll over the slot after you have spread the resin already, there will be no problem at all. I never experienced resin inside the box. the roller sucks up some resin, and if you have spread the freshly applied resin over the board, you take the roller, and roll gently over the slot, you won'twork with pressure and you look that the glass on the plastic of the box gets saturated. the glass over the slot will be saturated too, but there is no real danger that a lot of resin drains into the slot.
                      I do not work with a squeegee!!!
                      The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I set the finbox in at routed mortise that's slightly oversize. I use thickened epoxy without any glass in the mortise. Some boxes set in foam boards are set with glass sue to the less structural nature of foam as compared to wood. But if you're using wood blocking or 8# pour foam for the blocking then glass isn't needed. I carefully cut masking take to cover the finbox slot...easy to set up and clean up. If you use the Fins Unlimited longboard finbox it will have tabs that register the box to the bottom of the board very accurately. I used to check for square to the bottom but after quite a few installs like this I've found the taps to work perfectly if the bottom is flat. Good to check though. Once the box is set the "lip" is ground down flush with the bottom then the slot is taped off. The body of the box can be ground/sanded to the shape of the bottom. If you end up using the Fins Unlimited box make sure you don't press the registration tabs into the wood on the bottom since they will be hard to sand out. Hope that helps.
                        Randy http://clearwoodpaddleboards.com/
                        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuW...E0CzWCHvzwiVJQ

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Olddude View Post

                          If you apply the resin with a roller and roll over the slot after you have spread the resin already, there will be no problem at all. I never experienced resin inside the box. the roller sucks up some resin, and if you have spread the freshly applied resin over the board, you take the roller, and roll gently over the slot, you won'twork with pressure and you look that the glass on the plastic of the box gets saturated. the glass over the slot will be saturated too, but there is no real danger that a lot of resin drains into the slot.
                          I do not work with a squeegee!!!
                          Not to derail the thread but...
                          Old dude, do you use epoxy or polyester resin? What kind of roller? Is it a cloth type like for painting or a foam one like for painting also? Not sure if that helps answer my question, but I added some photos that i hope clear it up. I always hear about using rollers, but never knew which kind. I think the foam would work better than the cloth ones based on how they paint. The local fiberglass supply sells hard rubber rollers with kinda stubby teeth, but I've been told they are mostly used for boat building and using fiberglass mat not cloth.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            These are the covers I use. 1/8" nap is recommended for epoxy. I buy the 9" ones and cut them into 3" chunks. There are some that are much more expensive but I've found these work fine. Way easier and more controllable that a squeegee. I get them on Amazon but Jamestown Distributors has them as well.
                            Randy http://clearwoodpaddleboards.com/
                            https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuW...E0CzWCHvzwiVJQ

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              i work with epoxy and use those rollers, but mostly the one called „Velourrolle“
                              http://www.bootsservice-behnke.de/contents/de/d25.html
                              The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

                              Comment

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