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HELP! Suggestions for repairing a large indent/puncture in my hollow wooden SUP?

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  • HELP! Suggestions for repairing a large indent/puncture in my hollow wooden SUP?

    Hi all!

    I gotta admit, I did not build my board myself. I fell in love with the board the second I saw her – one of my most favorite possessions.

    It weighs probably 70lbs and I got lazy and was holding it like an idiot one day, and dropped it right on a small protruding tree root and it crushed a nice little indent with a puncture on the bottom right of the board maybe 2 feet from the nose. My board is hollow, but as I didn’t build it I’m not exactly certain what the interior looks like. I’ve done some research but have found a few different interior frame structures for hollow boards. I know it’s punctured through to the hollow core because 1) I can see it and 2) when I blow into the hole it fills up inside then “blows” back out, if that makes any sense.

    The indent is ~9x5cm and ~1.5cm deep in the center. The actual puncture is ~5cm long.

    I’ve attached some pictures of the indent/puncture. I’m hoping to get it looking as close to original condition as possible, within reason. Hoping to not just fill in with wood filler and epoxy over, but obviously open to the idea if there are no better suggestions (or if you think this might look okay! I am picturing a big ugly off-colored splotch). In my head I am envisioning pulling the crushed-in wood out (somehow) and sealing the puncture, then covering over with epoxy. How realistic is this? Not a clue!

    Clarification: I am by no means a seasoned woodworker, but I am very good with my hands and can build anything given proper instructions. I do not own an extensive suite of woodworking tools, though if necessary I am happy to acquire any that aren’t wildly expensive, or could possibly rent tools from somewhere.

    If anyone has any good suggestions here, I would really love to get some insight from some vets. Any suggestions greatly appreciated.

    JB
    hollow core exposed

  • #2
    More pics

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    • #3
      I would cut the section out and replace it. I think you could do it in a way that doesn't look ugly as a random splodge but a feature of the difference.

      I think repairing the wood as it is is unlikely. You could possibly cut out around it, then clamp that cut ut section down and glue then refit bt you would still have the space from the saw left behind to fill.

      Simply, you will not be able to do a totally invisible repair.

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      • #4
        It looks like it has been taped up and used. Water has got in and you can see where the wood is darker,wet. There doesn't seem to be any glass and the wood looks quite thin. I would start buy scrapping or sanding all the epoxy or whatever it is off anywhere the wood is darker and around the damage. Be careful not to sand the wood too much. You can then as Stew said cut out the damaged area and glue some new wood in,there are a few ways. Get the wet areas back to bare wood and let it dry out first. please send a pic of the rail near the damage. It looks quite wet.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tarquin View Post
          It looks like it has been taped up and used. Water has got in and you can see where the wood is darker,wet. There doesn't seem to be any glass and the wood looks quite thin. I would start buy scrapping or sanding all the epoxy or whatever it is off anywhere the wood is darker and around the damage. Be careful not to sand the wood too much. You can then as Stew said cut out the damaged area and glue some new wood in,there are a few ways. Get the wet areas back to bare wood and let it dry out first. please send a pic of the rail near the damage. It looks quite wet.
          Thank you Stew and Tarquin! Just saw these so will send pic of rail after work.

          You're right... I duct taped it to continue using during the camping weekend on which it was damaged. It worked fine at the time but then I added Gorilla tape on top of the duct tape and it spent a couple days in the rain which backfired and Gorilla held in moisture. Smart move :/

          What kind of saw would you recommend for cutting out the section, and how far around the damaged area would you recommend cutting? I am concerned I will cut through one of the ribs on the fishbone frame, which I am assuming is how this board was built. They may be thicker than usual as this board is a BIG HEAVY BABE (~70-80lbs). Is there a way to protect against cutting the ribs, and if not, what kind of issues might it cause missing a piece of one rib, if any?

          Thanks again guys I really appreciate it!

          JB

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          • #6
            Figured I'd attach a few pictures of her original beautiful state

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            • #7
              Cutting it out, depends on if you want to hold onto any of the original wood.

              A holesaw will give you a better idea of what's going on inside....

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              • #8
                You could route out the damaged planks all the way from nose to tail and repair with a different colored wood so it looks like a feature. The router will let you set the depth so you will not cut into the ribs. After removing the damage you will be able to see better inside and see if you caused more internal damage with the water.

                Where are you located? Maybe a builder is near by that could help.

                Kook on a wood board.

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                • #9
                  70-80 lbs! That seems really heavy. How wet did it get. Was there actually water inside?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Find out the material, guessing cedar from the photo, and try to find a piece that matches the current grain. Rout the damaged area out along the seams, grind make the epoxy and glass surrounding the repair area, epoxy ribs across the opening every inch or so and then glue the tight fitting repair in to the opening. Finish with glass and epoxy. Probably wont be able to tell it was repaired from a couple feet away. This would be a couple hours of repair time.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Thistle3585 View Post
                      Find out the material, guessing cedar from the photo, and try to find a piece that matches the current grain. Rout the damaged area out along the seams, grind make the epoxy and glass surrounding the repair area, epoxy ribs across the opening every inch or so and then glue the tight fitting repair in to the opening. Finish with glass and epoxy. Probably wont be able to tell it was repaired from a couple feet away. This would be a couple hours of repair time.
                      Thank you all! Sorry for the delayed response, got called out for a last minute work trip.

                      @ Kevin - I am considering this suggestion. Seems like the most simple option. What do you use to shape the planks before or after placing? I am in Salem MA / North Shore Boston area - know any good builders in the area?

                      @ Tarquin - it's been that weight forever - I do not believe any water actually got inside but I still have yet to find out for sure. Might be overestimating.
                      @ Tarquin - photos of rail attached. There is also a hairline crack that I didn't see before that may present additional issues.

                      @Thistle - yes, it's cedar. When you say "epoxy ribs across the opening every inch or so", what exactly do you mean? Epoxy over the existing ribs, or are you saying to insert additional pieces? Guessing the prior.

                      If I route out fully, I like Kevin's idea with different wood to look like a feature.

                      Found this article discussing wood boats, but (in my limited experience) I would imagine build methods are somewhat similar. http://www.classicboat.co.uk/practical-advice/repairing-the-hull-of-a-wooden-boat/ Any thoughts on this method? It seems like this wouldn't be too hard and minimally invasive.

                      Again, can't tell you guys how much I appreciate it. Wish there was some way I could return the favor. Maybe some day.

                      All the best,
                      JB

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                      • #12
                        You have ribs that run across the board that supports the top. If you rout a 2" wide strip that is 12" long then cut seven 1/4" strips that are 4" long. Glue them every two inches across the opening so that you create a "bridge" for the new piece to glue to.

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                        • #13
                          The graving technique would probably be the simplest approach and would require minimal tools. You'll just have an obvious repair which I don't think is a big deal.
                          Kook on a wood board.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Thistle3585 View Post
                            You have ribs that run across the board that supports the top. If you rout a 2" wide strip that is 12" long then cut seven 1/4" strips that are 4" long. Glue them every two inches across the opening so that you create a "bridge" for the new piece to glue to.
                            @Thistle @Kevin, thank you guys so much. This is perfect. This is an after-work project so I'll slowly get through it. I'm gonna give it a try - I'll check back in a couple weeks with some progress!

                            Thanks again everyone you've all been more than helpful.

                            Best,
                            JB

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                            • #15
                              - Router
                              - Miter Saw
                              - Wood glue

                              What other tools will I need?
                              What kind of Epoxy would you recommend? I'm looking at West System 105 / 207. Is there a way to get a smaller volume instead of the >$100 package?

                              Thanks again!
                              JB
                              Last edited by JBeats; 10-09-2017, 08:31 PM.

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