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Cutting out the weight reducing holes - using a jigsaw!

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  • Cutting out the weight reducing holes - using a jigsaw!

    Why have I not tried this before??

    Before, cutting out the weight reducing holes I've used a coping saw - that takes a while! I've also tried just drilling lots of holes.

    I decided to buy a cheap jigsaw the other day to try. Using it the right way up, didn't work well enough for me. Being able to support the work sufficiently was too tricky whle also making it easy to cut.

    A bit of thinking and hold the jigsaw upside down in the workbench....



    So much easier and definitely a winner for me! (I have now swapped to turning the saw on when the blade is through the hole though)

  • #2
    I use a hole saw in a drill press and do about 4-5 at the same time. As the ribs get thinner then I use a smaller hole saw. I don't like using a tool in a manner that it wasn't designed for. Seems like too much of a safety hazard.

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    • #3
      Any tool is a safety hazard. I'm assuming with your drill press you're using a guard on the bit and clamping your work down.

      Plenty of folk use jigsaws inverted and I think in many ways it's less risky doing it this way.

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      • #4
        My version of it looks a little safer:
        https://www.woodboardforum.com/forum...saw-substitute

        But any moving tool is a danger, especially the real fast moving...
        The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Surfdude View Post
          My version of it looks a little safer:
          https://www.woodboardforum.com/forum...saw-substitute

          But any moving tool is a danger, especially the real fast moving...
          Yep, that looks smart!

          No good for what I would need with the guides in place as I need access to the top.

          I thought of bolting it to a board rather than clamping it. The time it would have taken to find a board and appropriate fixings and get it set up, I would be pretty much done. If I was doing board after board then I would definitely bolt it through a board but wasn't worth it for this proof of concept.

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          • #6
            Tool safety aside. I look at efficiency. With my SUP, I had 28 ribs. I stacked them to make up about 6-7 bundles then used spring clamps to hold them together so I could cut holes with a hole saw on my drill press. To drill all of them took me 30 minutes because I had to clear the hole saw every 2-3 cuts. You had 2 minutes on one cutout, according to the video time stamp, so that would be almost 4 hours work.

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            • #7
              Yep, mine certainly takes longer than yours but is quicker than a coping saw and still maintains the maximum weight reduction that I can. Stacking multiple parts is fine with a largely parallel thickness board but if it's tapering then the difference in rib sizes would make stacking less favourable.

              Im happy though. I'll not bother sharing next time!

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              • #8
                I'm not trying to be a jerk. Further from that, just trying to share my experience in that someone else may benefit. If I come off rudely then I do apologize. That isn't my intention and I don't want to discourage people from participating.

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