Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cloth weight?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Another option is to reinforce the standing area with the same 3/8" x 1/4" strips that you use for your rail strips. This method allows you to omit the little pieces of wood that many builders add to their ribs to increase the gluing surface with less chance of one ever becoming a rattle inside your board.

    The video here shows how to quickly add these strips:

    http://sliverpaddleboards.com/adding...einforcements/
    Clayton
    http://sliverpaddleboards.com

    Comment


    • #17
      Great minds think alike Clayton :-) I've just spent the last couple days putting in reinforcing strips however, I cut and glued individual strips from scrap. I like your method though, might try that next time. Mines probably overkill and not as lightweight as yours but I didn't want to put a heel through my first board.

      Click image for larger version

Name:	P7081655.jpg
Views:	17
Size:	890.5 KB
ID:	1307
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #18
        No edit function and no FAQ on posting pics so will have to stumble through until I get it right.

        Comment


        • #19
          Another test pic

          Click image for larger version

Name:	P7081658.jpg
Views:	17
Size:	830.2 KB
ID:	1310

          Comment


          • #20
            ok that was easy enough although the preview doesn't really show it as it is.

            Comment


            • #21
              Looking good!
              Clayton
              http://sliverpaddleboards.com

              Comment


              • #22
                New guy here. Is that grid system really necessary or are people being overly cautious?

                Comment


                • #23
                  This is my first SUP build so I can't really say but I can tell you that this method feels very strong, I'm about 3/4's of the way along the deck and there is no flex whatsoever. I feel it's worth doing especially around the "footzone" as the cost in weight is minimal.

                  Having said that my deck boards are machined to 7mm so quite sturdy, on my next board I will start at 6mm and then the one after that 5mm and keep going until it feels right (or not right).

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Hi guys - reviving an old thread. Greenlight has some super light glass now - 1.5 oz. I was considering using this on the bottom and 4 oz on the top of my 7'11" in progress. Am I crazy? I built a 10' Waterlog from grain with 4 oz on top and bottom and, while its is an amazing classic board with nice glide, boy is it heavy.

                    Importantly, I'm trying to push the limits of making the board light. Crafting things is therapy for me so if I go a bit too far and learn I need to be more cautious next time, that is ok for me. Just don't want to take an approach that is destined to fail from the start.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I don't think you will save a huge amount on a small board like that. I think you could save more weight using g different wood like Paulownia and balsa. A really light frame.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        But yes you could go lighter cloth. Your joins ect just need to be really good. Non glassed hollow boards have been made!

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X