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  • Table Saw

    Good day guys. I was planning to buy my own Table saw. But I don't have any idea on what would be the best Table saw that I will use. I saw some of it in amazon and in this site http://www.elreviews.com/best-table-saw-reviews/. Please give me suggestions on what would be the best Table saw that I can use. Thank you in advance

  • #2
    Hi,
    i have the bosch GTS10XC , 10 inch blade and i'm very happy with it, i'm not familiar with these in the link you share .
    i know that not all the saw are with fence that are locked in both of the side like makita and that is something that can harm the accuracy.
    another thing is the auto stop that you might want to consider like the bosch reaxx table saw like the one in the link
    https://www.boschtools.com/us/en/mor...nfo/index.html

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    • #3
      I do have a cheap "home depot" table saw and after (miss-)using it, it is not table to cut straight anymore... there is a tolerance of 1-3mm to a m, to much...
      If I would buy me a new saw, I would opt for a "formatkreiss√§ge" a saw, with a moveable slidetable on one side of the blade. cheap ones are availlable at a size a little bigger than a table saw, but I do not know about the quality. Here you get them from the "Zipper" Brand and the cost about 400-500‚ā¨...

      http://www.ebay.de/itm/Zipper-ZI-FKS...wAAOSw0GJZnSdD

      As said, I do not know about the quality, but its rated good, but only by two users. There must be something similar availlable elsewhere.Finally a really good saw start at much higher prices, but for balsa and paulownia, the above type should work fine. I missused mine, sawing 2m (6ft) beams with 4'' height out of Larch Wood, which is not really hard like oak, but a little harder than pine...
      The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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      • #4
        I started with a cheap portable one. It was fine for ripping thin cedar but the miter slots were not standard size and had to rig an out feed table. I kept an eye on Craigslist and a nice Rigid turned up with a cast iron top & a nice fence for only $300. I added a cast iron router table and built a nice out feed table.
        Kook on a wood board.

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        • #5
          Not sure your budget and/or application but I'd suggest looking for a 10" cabinet saw in a local classified. You can often get a good saw cheap. Also, an out feed table will help with resawing long stock for paddle boards.

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          • #6
            My budget is 200$. It's okay if it's portable or what I just want something that will last longer.

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            • #7
              200 is not very much for a good tool (saw)..., but another question is for waht exact purpose you want to use it? Ripping thick pieces of wood, 3inches +, , with a straight cut, or just eventually sawing of already shaped planks or similar? If you are on a low budget and you need a versatile too, that can handle up to 1.5 inches, you could also think of a jigsaw and a table to install it upside down. It will be able to replace (within its natural limits) a couple of saws, even a band saw.
              See this:
              https://www.woodboardforum.com/forum...saw-substitute
              The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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              • #8
                Hey Rensell, If I were you I'd be looking for a older Delta or Rockwell large tablesaw. Sometimes they pop up on Craigslist or schools auction off old shop equipment. The older ones are built to work for a long time. JMHO.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by woodylogic View Post
                  Hey Rensell, If I were you I'd be looking for a older Delta or Rockwell large tablesaw. Sometimes they pop up on Craigslist or schools auction off old shop equipment. The older ones are built to work for a long time. JMHO.
                  I second this. Also don't cheap out on the blade.
                  Where are you located?
                  Kook on a wood board.

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                  • #10
                    Who of you is using a bandsaw? So far I have a circular handsaw. I am thinking about getting a bandsaw, because from a board building perspective it seems to me like the perfect addition. In my opinion it is best for resawing wood and also comes in handy when cutting frames.

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                    • #11
                      I have a small 10" Rikon bandsaw which unfortunately I haven't used much. The little I have I really like. Would really like a 14" or larger for resawing but I'm limited by height in my basement shop.
                      Kook on a wood board.

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                      • #12
                        Do you think a 12" bandsaw could also do the job? I am thinking about something like this: http://www.recordpower.co.uk/product...w#.Wf8T-OAxkgY

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by flobo View Post
                          Do you think a 12" bandsaw could also do the job? I am thinking about something like this: http://www.recordpower.co.uk/product...w#.Wf8T-OAxkgY
                          Each type of saws has its own advantage. Atable or circular saw or even a panel saw ist very good for straight cuts, if its a precise one. Good to rip planks etc, where long straight cuts are necessary. A bandsaw is not that precise cutting straight, but it is possible, its advantage is more on the curvy side, for long cuts. curvy and short can be achieved with a jigsaw.
                          For a limited budget I would look for a good circular (or panel) saw and a good jigsaw. For cutting ribs and especially with balsa I like my scroll or fret saw. For rectangle cuts a miter saw is a big help.
                          for boardbuilding purposes: A circular saw to rip and make planks, a band or jigsaw to cut the stringer, a band- or jig- or scrollsaw to cut the ribs. Thats what I would prefer, but especially the first one must be of good quality (mine is not..., I'm looking for replacement...) In general, if you work with lighter wood, like balsa or paulownia, a good result can be achieved already with cheaper tools, but harder woods, need better machines and in any case you should use good, sharp blades.
                          The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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                          • #14
                            I once resaw Paulownia on a table saw. Although the fence was really bad, it went suprisingly well. The only thing I did not like, was that so much material got lost. A lot goes airborne and this is really fine dust that stayes in the air forever and must be very unhealthy. I see the difficulty in making straight cuts with a bandsaw but like the possibility of using much thinner blades.

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