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1000x50x10mm planks - how would you use?

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  • 1000x50x10mm planks - how would you use?

    How would you use this size?
    Is there any video where I can see how someone uses this length to form a longer board... Or how they use the thicker width?

    I could just use a leveller but it seems wasteful.


  • #2
    10mm is really thick. Even if it is Balsa. What sort of wood is it? If the planks are only 1000 long stagger the joins. I tape along the bottom of the join then glue and weight down with something heavy and flat. There are lots of vids on YouTube for glueing up balsa for model aeroplane building.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply. It's paulowinia .
      I suppose I could use for a stringer in a foam core board

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      • #4
        It's kind of an odd size to cut into a usable thickness with little waste.
        Do you have a bandsaw? Resaw to 1000x50x3 and do two layers at an angle to the board & alternate direction of each layer. Just a thought.
        Kook on a wood board.

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        • #5
          I can't find a picture, but I made a 10 ft paddle board using 5 ft cedar boards. I laid them out diagonal over the plan shape. The decks ended up looking similar to Roy Stuart's boards.

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          • #6
            Found one.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by phillipjohnw View Post
              I can't find a picture, but I made a 10 ft paddle board using 5 ft cedar boards. I laid them out diagonal over the plan shape. The decks ended up looking similar to Roy Stuart's boards.
              I was going to reference Roy's boards too for a visual reference.
              Nice looking SUP.
              Kook on a wood board.

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              • #8
                Thanks, I wish I could say that it was my best work, but its not. Way too big of a project and it came out so heavy I'm surprised it floated. I think it weighed 45 lbs after glass. It was a wedding present and keepsake for the guy in the picture. He was super stoked about it. It is a convenient way to use shorter boards though.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by phillipjohnw View Post
                  Thanks, I wish I could say that it was my best work, but its not. Way too big of a project and it came out so heavy I'm surprised it floated. I think it weighed 45 lbs after glass. It was a wedding present and keepsake for the guy in the picture. He was super stoked about it. It is a convenient way to use shorter boards though.
                  Phillip- can you explain why it was too big? Or expand on any lessons learned about weight? Thanks!

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                  • #10
                    Just kind of a logistical nightmare for me. I have a relatively small garage/work area. I am constantly moving tools in and out to work on stuff. So a 10+ ft paddle board was not ideal. As far as weight, because the board was so big and I wasn't as good as I am now it came out on the sturdy side. It also got a hefty glass job which didn't help.

                    Vonbobo just curious, but what do you do for work? I've only heard the term lessons learned one place.

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                    • #11
                      Phillip I work in wireless telecom.

                      In Brad's videos, he mentions areas where a lot of glue isn't as important and it just becomes extra weight. Is that what you have found? And where?

                      Thanks for the knowledge!!
                      Jeff
                      Last edited by vonBobo; 03-23-2018, 03:53 PM.

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                      • #12
                        The only place I've ever heard someone say lessons learned is when I was in the navy. As far as glue weight I just use regular yellow glue and never worried about its weight. I do make my boards with weight as an afterthought. I would rather them be sturdy and a bit heavier.

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