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  • Eco friendly ideas

    I first built a wood board because I thought they looked cool, but since then I have become passionate about making my boards as eco friendly as I can. I realize I won't save the world doing this, but it's certainly become a passion. I was wondering what y'all do to make your boards more environmentally friendly, if anything.
    I use entropy bio resin for glassing, and I found some flax fiber online that I will try for my next board.
    Any other ideas out there? Please know I am in no way trying to talk down to anyone who isn't as concerned with Eco friendly stuff.

  • #2
    I used bamboo cloth on my first board. It's not as clear as glass and it needs to be stretched really good to get it as clear as possible.
    I'd like to try the lanolin oils next.
    Kook on a wood board.

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    • #3
      I couldn't find bamboo cloth when I looked. Is it still available anywhere? I am excited about trying flax fiber next.

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      • #4
        As long as we have to rely on resin, we may be ecofriendlier, but finally not ecofriendly... Even the bio-resin is, as far as I know, a lot of chemistry, the woods we are using are often paulownia and balsa, and not homegrown, but harvested somewhere around the world, especially balsa...
        What is ecofirendlier, a foam board made of already used eps, kinda recycled and protected with glasfilament and normal epoxy resin, or a woody build from wood, which has to be shipped around the world, flax fiber and bio resin. If you calculated everything, the advantages may be little...
        A real ecofriendly surfboard can only be made out of local timber, fir, spruce, with lots of wood, even the glue must be substituted by some natural glue, no glass, no resin, may be a protection with lanolin or linseed oil. Is it really possible to make it watertight? what will it weigh? (See Hucks Cedar slab). Even Paulownia must be protected with resin, or do we accept dings and dongs?

        These are just thoughts, I started with the idea of ecofriendliness too, but I realized without resin it will get difficult, of heavy...
        Maybe we have to change to alaias, to become really ecofriendly....

        As an alternative to flax fiber, which soaks a lot of resin, because its rather thick, you may try a simple cotton, but to make our boards surely waterproof, we need the resin, and even bio resin is harmful. The question is not the fiber, but how can we provide a construction, which does not rely on resin, whatever kind...., we discuss this subject in a german builder forum too, but finally the best solution which may be ecofriendly is paulownia, with a certain thickness to be sure the gluelines become watertight and some natural wax/oil. But the paulownia here usually comes from china.... and nobody knows how long it will be watertight, wear and tear will stress the gluelines....
        The best surfer is the one with the biggest smile on his face...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bret View Post
          I couldn't find bamboo cloth when I looked. Is it still available anywhere? I am excited about trying flax fiber next.
          I bought mine from Greenlight when they carried it. I found one place and this looks very similar... http://www.bamboofabricstore.com/ind...&products_id=1 Some useful info on working with cloth... http://www.surfinggreen.com.au/bamboo-fabric-faqs-2/
          Kook on a wood board.

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          • #6
            Lots of different ideas on "ecofriendly". I try to use locally sourced stuff when I can, build my boards solid to last a long time, pretty enough to (hopefully) be of decorative value even after they are no long surfable, keep them out of the sun when not being used, and I keep up on ding repairs so that they don't deteriorate ahead of their time.
            https://www.swaylocks.com/forums/i-got-chunk-wood

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            • #7
              Thanks for all the ideas so far. I agree that the advantages to an "eco friendly" board may be minimal, but I would argue that going into the lineup, a race, or whatever an eyecatching woodboard that people want to talk about draws attention. If that attention can spark a conversation about different ways the board is eco-friendlier than that still pushes us in the right direction, even if it is only incrementally. This is not to say that everyone you talk to will go home and build a locally sourced wood board with entropy bioresin, but I think the conversation is important nonetheless.
              On top of that there will never be a reason for the big companies to use more and more environmentally friendly products unless us consumers are buying/using them. My understanding is that Entropy is still pushing to develop eco friendlier materials than they already have.
              also
              I would love to know more about using lanolin or linseed oil. I have heard of it, but don't know anything about it.

              Thanks,
              Bret

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              • #8
                I wish every surfer out there would build their own, corporate entities are driven by greed for the most part, just building and riding your own is a huge step in the right direction.
                https://www.swaylocks.com/forums/i-got-chunk-wood

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                • #9
                  I strive to reduce my impact everywhere I can. I reclaim eps foam to use for core materials, I collect bits of pallets and wood fence to make skins. The cedar I have used in the past to build my boards comes from Canada, not exactly eco because of the shipping but still a better alternative to foam.

                  I only use Entropy Supersap, it’s a joy to work with. It is touted as 33% bio material.

                  When commercial mills are ripping pine for 2x4 construction lumber all the sticky pitch and sap is collected in a vat below the saw.

                  That sap is where they derive their bio content.

                  I try to minimize use of fiberglass cloth but I’m still evolving my process and it is necessary at this point to make a strong and light board.

                  All the boards i build are ecoboard certified and follow the guidelines in the sustainable surf initiative
                  Old enough to know better, young enough to do it anyway.

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                  • #10
                    I re-use plastic food packaging for mixing my resin. I try to mix only as much as I need, and minimize waste. I use hand tools whenever practical, over power tools. I re-purpose packing foam whenever I can incorporate it into the project. But I don't delude myself into thinking any of this impacts the serious polluters of this planet who, driven by greed and callous indifference, continue unabated.
                    Last edited by Huck; 12-06-2017, 12:12 PM.
                    https://www.swaylocks.com/forums/i-got-chunk-wood

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Grant Monast View Post

                      I only use Entropy Supersap, it’s a joy to work with. It is touted as 33% bio material.

                      When commercial mills are ripping pine for 2x4 construction lumber all the sticky pitch and sap is collected in a vat below the saw.

                      That sap is where they derive their bio content.

                      I have often wondered what the biobased material in super sap is. Thats cooler than I thought it would be.

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                      • #12
                        Thanks again for keeping this going. I have been thinking alot about what I use to glue the strips on to the frames. If I use something like entropy bioresin then I end up throwing away whatever I apply the thickened epoxy with. I was thinking about gorilla glue, but I couldn't find anything about its environmental impact. Anyone know anything in regards to this. I have heard gorilla glue is super low VOC, but I would love to know more.

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                        • #13
                          It's a difficult path the environmental one. I spent some time looking for bio products and talking to different people. I think the best thing you can do is use local products and as little of the bad stuff like epoxy as possible. Fiberglass is not that bad apparently. Flax,linen etc is a lot more difficult to produce and soaks up more resin. I can get Paulownia from Europe, Sicomin epoxy from France that they say is 56 % bio and there are a few big fiberglass companies in France. I don't try to make Eco boards but think about where things come from.
                          I have found a HD foam that is made from recycled plastic bottles. I am going to try this next on a EPS blank Made in Europe. I am in France buy the way.
                          I am using cork quite a lot now too,from Portugal.

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